Monday, 9 April 2018

Armiger Knight Estratus of Forgeworld Brakhus-Alpha

Hey hey hey,


So I am deep in my thesis writing, hence the lack of anything on here! But it is going well, and fingers crossed I will be submitted in a couple of months or so. Then I will sleep again! So, so tired...

Anyway, in my little spare time I have had, work has progressed on chipping paint and I finally had the courage to apply it to one of my brand new Armiger miniatures which was the whole point of the practise exercises. 







Overall, I'm pretty happy with how this came out. I have 3 more to paint in a similar style and I am confident that the execution should improve as I go along. In terms of bases, they will be having swamp styled bases that means I have to do some further practise with water effects, to create ankle deep water for at least a couple of the bases. So expect to see some practise work at some point.

With the final knight I was considering making a tutorial for how I did all of the painting and chipped/rust effects. But only if people would find that helpful, as lord above it slows down painting to take pictures of every (of the many many  many) stages. 

Would that be useful?

I still want to get some black weathering powder to apply to the ends of the melta weapons, but I haven't been able to make it to the hobby shop that sells it in town recently. 

Back to Deathguard after this Sojourn and then onto... Aeldari!

Peace out,

Rob

6 comments:

  1. I love this and think the chipping is great. There are just two parts of the rust that are anomolous to me - the muzzle of the Melta and shin piston.

    I imagine the Melta gets quite hot - hence why you see so many that are heat damaged. It may well be that it could be rusty and you can 'fluff-con' anything but it just seems out of place it would weather. Certainly some soot powder would mitigate that uncertainty [personally drybrushing black usually gives me the same result].

    Secondly the shin piston, that's rusty, where I imagine there would be continuous travel, whereas it's mounting above it seems quite clean and fresh. However, it might not be a piston at all as there really isn;t any capacity for it to move inside the shin joint. I dunno, it just looks a little odd, some vertical scratches across it might make more sense. With 3 more I'd try the inverse - shiny[er] piston and rusty joint - see which works best,

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    1. I'm not entirely sure that is a piston on the shin. It might just be the shin, with extra bracing around the joins.

      I do agree with you on the Melta barrel, tho. Rust seems like an odd effect to have happened there, compared to soot and/or heat discolouration.

      Overall, tho, it looks fantastic. Excellent use of the chipping fluid.

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    2. Thanks for the comments guys :)

      Regarding the piston (and I'm pretty sure it is a piston) it would rust more in a situation where it has run out of lubricant due to the constant grin on the surface. The joints are a bit less rusty than I wanted, but I didn't realise till after the lacquer that there was still so much shiny on there, things to note going forward!

      Re the melta, thats a funny one actually! I will be sooting them up as I said above, so should be nice and blackened as soon as I get some more weathering powder. But in terms of rusting, they would definitely be as rusty as it, extreme heat catalyses the oxidation of ferrous material (such as why exhausts get rusty due to the heat). Heat discolouration is actually the start of metal oxidation.

      I guess the thing to note is that these guys have been going for ~500 years with no maintenance and so that effect would really come through. Obviously, I didn't say that as the fluff isn't complete and so why would you know! But that's why are the way they are :)

      Hopefully, the execution will get better going along, and the soot will alleviate those worries.

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    3. Ah, yes. I usually think of rust as associated with water damage, so my line of thought was something like "hot=>removes any water=>no rust", but now that you say that, it makes perfect sense that the heat would, itself, cause oxidation.

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  2. Fantastic work, man - Loving that weathering, it has a great texture. The red and blue color scheme is super striking as well, good stuff!

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  3. Lovely job Rob. I too don't think the front one is a piston, the rear two are but also Duncan paints the wrong bit bright silver, the lower parts are the piston inner tube when you compare the travel between both legs, so who is to know ;) Very striking scheme, a few more Knights on their way eh? Tutorial would be good, but write that thesis first!

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